Showing posts with label Physical Fitness. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Physical Fitness. Show all posts

Monday, June 15

SNACKTIME – ensure a happy and safe summer by keeping your child hydrated with H2O

Children do not cool down as efficiently as adults, so it is important that they drink lots of water. Taking a few simple precautions will help protect children and allow them to enjoy a safe and fun summer!

Preventing Dehydration – How frequently should children drink fluids? How much is enough?
The best way to prevent dehydration is to make sure children drink plenty of water at all times. They should consume more fluids than they lose. During continuous physical activity, a child can lose up to a half-liter of fluid per hour. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) suggests that an 88-pound child should drink about five ounces (or two kid-size gulps) of water every 20 minutes as well. Children and teens weighing about 132 pounds should drink nine ounces of water. Drinking extra water before organized sports or other strenuous activities is highly recommended.

Hydration Habits for Good Health
  • Schedule beverage breaks every 20 minutes during any physical activity, especially in hot weather. If possible, take all hydration breaks in a shady spot.
  • Pack frozen water bottles in a cooler to keep other bottles of water cool.
  • When choosing drinks for kids, avoid soda and other drinks that have caffeine, which contributes to water loss in the body. Again, water is the preferred choice for hydration.
  • Sports drinks should be limited to athletic competitions to replace electrolytes.
  • If your young child refuses to drink water, offer a high water content fruit such as watermelon or a frozen treat such as popsicles.
  • Remember that thirst is not a good early sign of dehydration. By the time a child feels thirsty, he or she may already be dehydrated.

Good hydration habits are as important as good eating habits. Encouraging frequent beverage breaks and choosing liquids wisely will help protect against dehydration.

Submitted by Leslie Kay-Getzinger, MS RD
Regional Dietitian for Nutrition Management Services Company

Image Contributed by

Monday, June 1

A to Z: in support of the student athlete

In the pursuit of academic success, children sometimes need a break from the classroom and an opportunity to release pent-up energy. While academic success is no small feat, students who participate in at least one extracurricular physical activity are proven to reap more benefits than those who do not exercise regularly.

Engaging in sports activities each week helps improve students’ focus on school work, as well as help them lead happier, healthier lives. Here are four reasons why students should be involved in structured, after-school physical activities.

  1. Academic Performance - Studies show that students involved in athletic programs maintain a higher GPA and achieve higher test scores. provides a list of recent studies proving the correlation between academic success and physical fitness.
  2. Fitness Habits - Sports help students develop coordination and teaches them how to care for their bodies through proper stretching and the development of fundamental mechanics. Participating in athletics at an early age instills physical fitness habits that carry over into adulthood, helping to avoid health problems.
  3. Mental and Emotional Benefits - Athletics have great physical benefits, but also help children to improve mentally and emotionally. While the body exercises, the brain releases endorphines. From a biological standpoint alone, students who are physically active are happier and have a constructive outlet through which to relieve stress.
  4. Development of Specific Skills - Through athletics, students are able to accumulate a whole host of skills and abilities. Leadership, teamwork, confidence, and self-reliance are the big character focuses. Critical thinking is developed on the playing field as athletes need to quickly solve problems created by their opponents. Time management, a skill necessary in adulthood, is also brought into play as children learn to balance their time between schoolwork, sports, and family life.

Even if your child is not interested in team sports, there are plenty of less intense, solitary options. Activities such as swimming, gymnastics, track, martial arts, yoga, and golf provide physical benefits and allow students to engage in an extracurricular activity where they can advance at their own pace.

For more student athlete information, as well as great drills and exercises, visit the Fairmont Pinterest board Student Athletes!

Contributed by Rebecca Stokes, Fairmont Private Schools

Image by Popsugar