Showing posts with label Character. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Character. Show all posts

Wednesday, October 21

A to Z: Developing Hobbies

People often need a constructive distraction from the pressures of daily life. Deadline-free in nature, hobbies are a great solution because they allow participants to engage in the activity at their own pace. Encouraging your child to pursue a hobby is a great way to build upon skills and reinforce concepts learned in the classroom and at home. For example, collection hobbies require patience and observance. Craft hobbies, such as modeling or sewing, require fine motor skills and an element of creativity. Even if your child has yet to master fine motor skills or has trouble with being patient, hobbies are a great opportunity for children to engage in an interest with no outside pressure, while subconsciously honing specific skills.

Introducing your child to a new pastime also creates the potential for bonding. Does your child show an interest in a hobby of yours, or simply a desire to be near you? If so, take the opportunity to include your child in your favorite pastime. Doing this not only allows you and your child to spend more time together, but also allows you to pass down specific knowledge.

Another great benefit of hobbies is that many are relatively cheap. Collection hobbies, such as stamp or coin collecting, simply require that the participant be watchful and learn to look for the items in the spare change jar or pile of discarded envelopes. Even if you are not experienced in a hobby that your child takes an interest in, resources such as YouTube, Pinterest, and books from your local library can quickly educate you and your child about a particular activity. Here are a few basic hobby ideas:

Natural Collecting (rocks, leaves, etc.)
Stamp Collecting
Coin Collecting
Model Building
Photography or Filmmaking
Crafting (knitting, crochet, sewing, cross stitch, etc.)

Contributed by Rebecca Stokes, Fairmont Private Schools
Image by All Womens Talk  

Wednesday, September 30

A to Z: Community Service

Young people these days are very busy. Between school, homework, soccer practice, and more, there doesn’t seem to be much time left over. However, teaching your child the importance of community service is incredibly beneficial for his or her transition into becoming a responsible adult. Instilling manners at home, along with encouraging good citizenship and a sense of community, will help to foster empathy and self-awareness in children of any age. Engaging in opportunities to serve may help your child become more culturally diverse, learn about socio-economic differences within your community, discover specific skills or interests, and most importantly, learn the value of helping those in need.

Most communities and local organizations are almost always in need of extra hands to volunteer. Public libraries, schools, churches, and civic organizations are great resources for identifying potential causes and opportunities that might be a good match for your child. Websites such as VolunteerMatch are great for finding local community service opportunities specifically for children. If you’re still in need of ideas, think about visiting your local food bank or senior living center, donating goods to the Salvation Army or local homeless shelter, or even simply having your child take a Saturday to help friends, relatives, or neighbors with household or outside chores. Explore some of these non-profit nationally-recognized volunteer organizations:

The seeds planted when serving one’s community will take root and help your child to grow into a well-rounded, giving individual. Making community service outings a family affair is a great option which will create stronger bonds between family members, create memories, and provide an outstanding example for your children to follow.

Click to read about the different ways Fairmont students are serving their communities!

Contributed by Rebecca Stokes, Fairmont Private Schools

Image by KCHA News