Showing posts with label Music. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Music. Show all posts

Wednesday, September 16

A to Z: Classical Music on the Brain

For years, researchers have been searching for links between music and cognition. Many parenting resources suggest that playing classical music to your infant promotes brain stimulation and cognitive growth in hopes that the child will develop more efficiently in a mental and social capacity. But does music really impact the IQ of your child?

1993 proved to be the height of music-brain research with the “Mozart Effect” study, which detailed the effects of Mozart on high school and college students while taking tests. The study demonstrated a correlation between receiving high scores on an exam and the students who listened to Mozart sonatas before the exam. The Mozart Effect, however, proved inconclusive due to the fact that other researchers were never able to duplicate the results. The outcome of the follow-up studies concluded that classical music aides in spatial awareness, but not overall intelligence. Spatial awareness is defined as the ability to recognize the characteristics or location of an object in relation to another object. Related subject areas include geometry, geography, art, and technology.

Researchers have identified that while classical music won’t directly increase intelligence, the complexity of classical music does play a significant role in opening the brain to more complex problems and solutions. The mathematics and patterns involved in writing music, playing an instrument, or simply listening to music with complex structures has been found to aid in the mental and visual solving of puzzles and patterns.   

Other benefits of classical music can include the lowering of blood pressure and an increase in the sensation of relaxation. Classical music has also proven to decrease the effects and frequency of seizures in epileptics. Essentially, studies have shown show that people who listen to complex music, such as classical or opera, are more likely to see an increase in creativity, concentration, and the ability to manipulate spatial relationships.

In honor of Classical Music Month, here are several great classical and operatic tracks to enjoy with your child:
Ave Maria, Schubert
Waltz of the Flowers, Tchaikovsky
Dance of the Swans, Tchaikovsky
The Flight of the Bumblebee, Rimsky-Korsakov

Contributed by Rebecca Stokes, Fairmont Private Schools
Image by USC News

Friday, May 29


Highlights of the Week

Studying since February for their competition on May 2nd, the Anaheim Hills 6th Grade Pentathlon Team was thrilled to learn that they had placed 1st overall in the 2015 6th Grade Orange County Pentathlon! The team also earned 2nd place in the Super Quiz Relay and amassed 30 individual medals in all subjects including science, history, math, and literature!

Congratulations to the North Tustin MVP athletes Sofia R. (Soccer), Karishma R. (Volleyball), Nadia A. (Basketball), James K. (Golf), Ryan H. (Basketball), and Andrew L. (Football & Soccer)!

Historic Anaheim students close the 2014-2015 performing arts season with concerts featuring songs such as "Shake it Off," "Ode to Joy," "Shoo Fly," and the Pink Panther theme.

Weekly Newsletters

Contributed by Rebecca Stokes, Fairmont Private Schools

Wednesday, May 27

CHALK TALK: the many benefits of music in early education

Music fosters creative thought and much more!

Fairmont’s early childhood education programs offer a sensory rich environment for heightening a child’s senses, which is essential for providing the foundation of a well-rounded education. Music plays a major role in this effort by helping our young learners grow in many areas of personal and academic development. 

Whether listening to Beethoven, banging on drums or dancing to a song, music helps students gain confidence for learning and trying new things. At the same time, they exercise their language, vocal, and fine motor skills. When singing folk songs or dancing to famous jazz tunes, children have the opportunity to explore the richness of American culture and its history. 

Besides nurturing creativity, confidence, and a better understanding of history, musical activities such as sing-a-longs help children feel they are members of a community.  Hands-on music participation and appreciation incorporates lessons in math, reading, and writing.  For example, learning how to keep a steady beat, rhythm, and melody involves engaging mathematical concepts such as sequencing, counting, and patterning. 

The whole family can engage in music appreciation in the home, car, and at concert venues. Fairmont’s Music Department Chair Adela Stella encourages parents and grandparents to take children to see summer concerts in the park to experience the excitement of live performances.

Contributed by Doug Fleischli, Fairmont Private Schools

Image by KinderMusik